Lawmaker From Minnesota Is Proposing New Law To Take Away Food Stamps And Other Benefits From Folks Convicted During Protests

A lawmaker from the state of Minnesota is now proposing legislation that would take away food stamps, unemployment benefits, and access to other government programs from convicted protesters. Health care and student loans are also part of the losses these individuals could face.

A new report from TheBlaze, “Republican state Sen. David Osmek authored the legislation as the nation awaits a decision in the jury trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who was charged in the death of George Floyd.”

“After a long day of closing arguments, the jurors deliberated about four hours before retiring for the night to the hotel where they are being sequestered for this final phase of the trial, the Associated Press reported. They were slated to resume Tuesday morning,” TheBlaze report said.

“A person convicted of a criminal offense related to the person’s illegal conduct at a protest, demonstration, rally, civil unrest, or march is ineligible for any type of state loan, grant, or assistance, including but not limited to college student loans and grants, rent and mortgage assistance, supplemental nutrition assistance, unemployment benefits and other employment assistance, Minnesota supplemental aid programs, business grants, medical assistance, general assistance, and energy assistance,” the bill said.

Unfortunately, the bill is probably not going to pass, thanks to Democrats being in control of the state House along with the governor’s office although it is doubtful that this bill would be proposed if the GOP was in control. They rarely show this kind of aggressiveness with political power choosing instead to play small ball so they won’t be called racist.

 

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