30Sep

New Poll Reveals 65% Of Voters Don’t Think Americans Should Lose Jobs If They Refuse To Obey Vaccine Mandate

Michael Cantrell

According to a brand new poll, the vast majority of American voters do not support the idea of folks losing their jobs if they reject the vaccine mandate from the Biden administration.

A whopping 65 percent of voters answered “no” when they were asked, “Do you believe Americans should lose their jobs if they object to taking the COVID-19 vaccine?” according to a survey conducted by the Convention of States Action/Trafalgar Group.

Only 22 percent of voters who participated in the survey thought that Americans should lose their jobs if they do not get vaccinated, while 13 percent said they were unsure.

via Washington Examiner:

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The sentiment that jobs should not be sacrificed for vaccine mandates is one shared across the aisle, the data showed.

About 84% of Republicans agreed with the opinion, as did 64% of independents and 48% of Democrats , according to the analysis.

“Washington, DC is making it clear the mandates are not about immunity but about conformity,” Mark Meckler, who currently serves as the president of Convention of States Action, went on to say in a statement.

The government is continuously publishing information that contradicts the effectiveness of vaccines and the benefit of natural immunity, he added.

“[More] and more Americans are standing up against the forced vaccination of American workers,” Meckler then wrote. “The message here is clear: your livelihood should not be put at risk because you don’t want the vaccine.”

The poll was conducted between the dates of Sept. 17 and Sept. 19 among 1,079 likely general election voters, with a margin of error of 2.96 percentage points.

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