24Feb

Smith College Whistleblower Resigns Over “Racially Hostile Environment”

Isa Ryan

There are millions of Americans who read the scathing words we write about the Marxist Critical Race Theory that has so suddenly popped up across the narratives of both corporate America and the federal government and agree that the ideas are bad for our country.

Yet they are afraid to speak their agreement out loud in their regular, everyday life.

Bari Weiss, a centrist writer who resigned from the New York Times over what she decried as a hostile culture, says she now gets calls from people all over the country who are concerned about the toxicity of CRT as their children are subject to radical ideology in school and employees are forced to undergo training sessions to resent their own skin.

None of these people want to go public, however.

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This is why, Weiss wrote in her Substack newsletter this month, we need more women like Smith College whistleblower Jodi Shaw.

Shaw recently uploaded a video to YouTube exposing the racist treatment she was subject to at the prestigious New England college, where her salary was less than the annual cost of tuition.

The lifelong liberal, Weiss explains, “ has had a front-row seat to the illiberal, neo-racist ideology masquerading as progress.”

Here is her initial video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blqpCMChBpI

Now, Weiss reports, Shaw has resigned from the college, turning down a massive settlement that would have left her off with more financial security, something which was no doubt appealing to the divorced mother-of-two, previously earning just $45,000.

Shaw shared the letter she issued to Smith College President Kathleen McCartney in her resignation, which she published in full (you can read it here, we have published it in part) below.

It is inspiring and you’ve got to agree—we really, really need more people like this woman:

Dear President McCartney:

I am writing to notify you that effective today, I am resigning from my position as Student Support Coordinator in the Department of Residence Life at Smith College. This has not been an easy decision, as I now face a deeply uncertain future. As a divorced mother of two, the economic uncertainty brought about by this resignation will impact my children as well. But I have no choice. The racially hostile environment that the college has subjected me to for the past two and a half years has left me physically and mentally debilitated. I can no longer work in this environment, nor can I remain silent about a matter so central to basic human dignity and freedom.

Under the guise of racial progress, Smith College has created a racially hostile environment in which individual acts of discrimination and hostility flourish. In this environment, people’s worth as human beings, and the degree to which they deserve to be treated with dignity and respect, is determined by the color of their skin. It is an environment in which dissenting from the new critical race orthodoxy — or even failing to swear fealty to it like some kind of McCarthy-era loyalty oath — is grounds for public humiliation and professional retaliation.

I can no longer continue to work in an environment where I am constantly subjected to additional scrutiny because of my skin color. I can no longer work in an environment where I am told, publicly, that my personal feelings of discomfort under such scrutiny are not legitimate but instead are a manifestation of white supremacy. Perhaps most importantly, I can no longer work in an environment where I am expected to apply similar race-based stereotypes and assumptions to others, and where I am told — when I complain about having to engage in what I believe to be discriminatory practices — that there are “legitimate reasons for asking employees to consider race” in order to achieve the college’s “social justice objectives.”

What passes for “progressive” today at Smith and at so many other institutions is regressive. It taps into humanity’s worst instincts to break down into warring factions, and I fear this is rapidly leading us to a very twisted place. It terrifies me that others don’t seem to see that racial segregation and demonization are wrong and dangerous no matter what its victims look like. Being told that any disagreement or feelings of discomfort somehow upholds “white supremacy” is not just morally wrong. It is psychologically abusive.

Equally troubling are the many others who understand and know full well how damaging this is, but do not speak out due to fear of professional retaliation, social censure, and loss of their livelihood and reputation. I fear that by the time people see it, or those who see it manage to screw up the moral courage to speak out, it will be too late.

I wanted to change things at Smith. I hoped that by bringing an internal complaint, I could somehow get the administration to see that their capitulation to critical race orthodoxy was causing real, measurable harm. When that failed, I hoped that drawing public attention to these problems at Smith would finally awaken the administration to this reality. I have come to conclude, however, that the college is so deeply committed to this toxic ideology that the only way for me to escape the racially hostile climate is to resign. It is completely unacceptable that we are now living in a culture in which one must choose between remaining in a racially hostile, psychologically abusive environment or giving up their income.

As a proud Smith alum, I know what a critical role this institution has played in shaping my life and the lives of so many women for one hundred and fifty years. I want to see this institution be the force for good I know it can be. I will not give up fighting against the dangerous pall of orthodoxy that has descended over Smith and so many of our educational institutions.

This was an extremely difficult decision for me and comes at a deep personal cost. I make $45,000 a year; less than a year’s tuition for a Smith student. I was offered a settlement in exchange for my silence, but I turned it down. My need to tell the truth — and to be the kind of woman Smith taught me to be — makes it impossible for me to accept financial security at the expense of remaining silent about something I know is wrong. My children’s future, and indeed, our collective future as a free nation, depends on people having the courage to stand up to this dangerous and divisive ideology, no matter the cost.

Sincerely,

Jodi Shaw

 

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